17 04 14
reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .
reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .
No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.Aesop (via left-at-interamna)

(Source: psych-facts)

reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .
16 04 14
reblogged from: Nature and more
libutron:

creatures-alive:

Lime reed frog by Mariska Boertjens

Hyperolius fusciventris (Hyperoliidae)

libutron:

creatures-alive:

Lime reed frog by Mariska Boertjens

Hyperolius fusciventris (Hyperoliidae)

reblogged from: Nature and more
libutron:

Jewel of Nature - Common Crow chrysalis - Euploea core | ©Sivakumar V. K. (India)
The Common Crow, Euploea core (Nymphalidae) is a species of butterfly common in South Asia. It is famous for its pupa, shiny, metallic silvery gold, about two centimetres long. It is usually found hanging from the underside of a leaf of its food plant. The pupa in spite of its appearance is not metallic. The shining effect is the result of of being covered by numerous transparent layers of skin.

libutron:

Jewel of Nature - Common Crow chrysalis - Euploea core | ©Sivakumar V. K. (India)

The Common Crow, Euploea core (Nymphalidae) is a species of butterfly common in South Asia. It is famous for its pupa, shiny, metallic silvery gold, about two centimetres long. It is usually found hanging from the underside of a leaf of its food plant. The pupa in spite of its appearance is not metallic. The shining effect is the result of of being covered by numerous transparent layers of skin.

reblogged from: Nature and more
15 04 14
reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .

(Source: mh-things)

reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .
realgirlsgaming:

lifeisbutts:

Oh man, I feel like I should become a terrible person and start attacking people like in the last panel.

HAHAHAHAHAAAA.

realgirlsgaming:

lifeisbutts:

Oh man, I feel like I should become a terrible person and start attacking people like in the last panel.

HAHAHAHAHAAAA.

(Source: radrangy)

reblogged from: Nature and more
libutron:

Chioides albofasciatus, White-striped Longtail | ©tripp.davenport (Frontera Audubon, Weslaco, Hidalgo County Texas)
An American butterfly in the family Hesperiidae with range from Argentina north through Central America to the West Indies and South Texas. Occasional stray to southwest New Mexico and southern Arizona.
Two distinctive features of this butterfly are the hindwing with a very long tail, and that the underside of hindwing has a long silver-white band from the costa to the base of the tail.
[Source]

libutron:

Chioides albofasciatus, White-striped Longtail | ©tripp.davenport (Frontera Audubon, Weslaco, Hidalgo County Texas)

An American butterfly in the family Hesperiidae with range from Argentina north through Central America to the West Indies and South Texas. Occasional stray to southwest New Mexico and southern Arizona.

Two distinctive features of this butterfly are the hindwing with a very long tail, and that the underside of hindwing has a long silver-white band from the costa to the base of the tail.

[Source]

14 04 14

Holy crap it’s a flying teddy-bear. Metre-long squirrel glides through the air. It’s bigger than a housecat.

reblogged from: Nature and more
rhamphotheca:

Call of the Bloom:  
Some tropical flowers reflect sound so nectar-seeking bats can find them more easily.
by Susan McGrath
Nature’s inventiveness knows no bounds. Consider the case of the nectar-drinking bat and the night-flowering vine whose lives intertwine in the lowland tropical forests of Central America.
Glossophaga commissarisi, a tiny, winged mammal with a body no bigger than your thumb, flits among the flowers of Mucuna holtonii, lapping nectar, much as hummingbirds and bumblebees do. In exchange it pollinates the plant. In daylight flowers can flaunt their wares with bright colors such as scarlet and fuchsia, but at night, when even the brightest hues pale to a moonlit silver, Mucuna flowers resort to sound to catch the ear of nectar bats.
At La Selva Biological Station in northern Costa Rica a vigorous old Mucuna has woven a leafy ceiling above a forest clearing and lowered dozens of flowers into the opening on long, green stalks. The flowers dangle at staggered heights in the vaulted clearing like chandeliers in a shadowy ballroom, each palm-size inflorescence a whorl of pale yellow, pea-pod-shaped buds on arched stems…
(read more: National Geo)
photograph by Merlin D. Tuttle

rhamphotheca:

Call of the Bloom: 

Some tropical flowers reflect sound so nectar-seeking bats can find them more easily.

by Susan McGrath

Nature’s inventiveness knows no bounds. Consider the case of the nectar-drinking bat and the night-flowering vine whose lives intertwine in the lowland tropical forests of Central America.

Glossophaga commissarisi, a tiny, winged mammal with a body no bigger than your thumb, flits among the flowers of Mucuna holtonii, lapping nectar, much as hummingbirds and bumblebees do. In exchange it pollinates the plant. In daylight flowers can flaunt their wares with bright colors such as scarlet and fuchsia, but at night, when even the brightest hues pale to a moonlit silver, Mucuna flowers resort to sound to catch the ear of nectar bats.

At La Selva Biological Station in northern Costa Rica a vigorous old Mucuna has woven a leafy ceiling above a forest clearing and lowered dozens of flowers into the opening on long, green stalks. The flowers dangle at staggered heights in the vaulted clearing like chandeliers in a shadowy ballroom, each palm-size inflorescence a whorl of pale yellow, pea-pod-shaped buds on arched stems…

(read more: National Geo)

photograph by Merlin D. Tuttle

reblogged from: Mega-ohkthxbai
13 04 14
reblogged from: Mega-ohkthxbai

(Source: s-ensitivus)

reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .

notyourdaddy:

notyourdaddy:

random snaps of my last house. In the mountains of Tennessee…

www.benjyrussell.net

So….I had no idea when I randomly threw these photos up on here that they were going to take off like this. It was such a beautiful place to get to live. We invited so many artists out to stay with us and to make work out in the woods. It was absolute magic….

reblogged from: Left at Interamna . . .
Dear disability rights nonprofits, activists, and everyone else. Have you reached out to your Black constituents? Have you publicly expressed your outrage? Are you silent now? Because if you are, you are sending a message that Black lives are irrelevant. You are erasing my son’s life and my life as well.On Murder of Jordan Davis By Michael Dunn (via disabilityhistory)